The Program

The program offered plenaries, workshops, panels, discussion groups, dream groups. The conference learning emphasis was on knowledge and information sharing in an environment that encouraged experiential learning, dream sharing, individual and group processes, social gathering and celebration. Areas of interest were:

  • Dreams and physical illness
  • Precognitive dreams
  • Trauma, nightmares and healing dreams
  • Dream incubation practices
  • Creative dream practices
  • Dreamgroups
  • Dreaming, imagination and social-cultural landscapes

Cost

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Overview of Papers, Workshops and Panels

Below is a listing of Papers, Workshops and Panels, listed in alphabetical order by author's last name. For each listing we have provided an abstract as well as profiles for each speaker. Simply click a link below to view a specific listing.

 

 Exploring Aspects of Personal and Group Transformative Changes in Long-Term Dream Groups
Dr Susannah Benson; Dr Diane Greig Rickards - 1 hour paper

Dr Susannah Benson

Susannah Benson, (PhD), is an educator and transpersonal counsellor with qualifications and experience in education, publishing, social ecology, and transpersonal counselling. She has facilitated dream groups and given workshops and presentations on dreams and creative imaginal processes for over 12 years. She is founding president of Dream Network Australia, IASD Board member and IASD Australian Regional Representative.

Dr Diane GreigRickards

Diane GreigRickards, PhD. is a psychologist with a doctorate in transpersonal psychology. She is in private practice, facilitates dream groups and has given presentations internationally on dream groups, intuitive inquiry, cultural shadow and women's wartime intelligence narratives. She has authored several articles and is currently writing a book chapter, "Living Light Dreaming".

Abstract:

This paper presentation is a joint initiative that has grown out of collaborative discussions, and shared interest in the facilitation and participation in dream groups. The focus of the presentation will be on sharing the experiences and insights of participants in 3 long-term dream groups. Two dreamgroups, which are no longer active, continued for six years, the other dreamgroup is now in its third year. We present the story of these experiences from our separate facilitation and participation in these dreamgroups.

Our enquiry into what is the nature of the potential transformative experience for dreamgroup members is explored through the personal shared narratives, dream images, and artwork of the participants.

Transformation is reflected upon in terms of a personal journey of discovery that increases insight and awareness. Transformation is also reflected upon through the lens of the group process. Several qualitative features of transformation are discussed in terms of creativity, shifts in consciousness, and an expanded awareness of the transpersonal field. The potential transformative nature of dream groups in terms of social and cultural contexts is also discussed. We draw out from this discussion the key features contributing to the longevity, coherence, and sustainability of long-term dream groups.

We conclude the presentation with a discussion of our own separate roles of facilitation and co-participatory enquiry

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 Working with Dreams, Trauma and Physical IllnessRobert Bosnak

Robert Bosnak

Robert Bosnak is a Zurich trained Jungian psychoanalyst with an international professional practice. Robert is a past president of IASD. He is the pioneer of the Embodied Imaginal Dreamwork process. He has written several books, including: ‘Tracks in the Wilderness of Dreams’; Embodiment: Creative Imagination in Medicine, Art and Travel, and the perennially popular book, A little Course in Dreams. Robert is currently a Director of the Santa Barbara Healing Sanctuary.

Abstract:

While visiting the Tsunami devastated areas in Japan I was told by a monk who leads many funerals that nightmares have started only recently, after about a year. Before people were in a dreamless shock. A method we developed called 'neutral witness embodiment' proved effective in treating some traumatic nightmares and memories.

Following ample evidence found by archeologists of Western medicine, our experience at the Santa Barbara Healing Sanctuary (www.sbhsanctuary.com) teaches us that dream-based treatments for physical illness -- treatments which used to be called Asclepian, named after the Physician god Asklepios whose adepts were called ‘physicians’ can be highly effective.

This lecture will include a brief description of a dream-based method called embodied imagination, a presentation of work with dreams and trauma, and of dreamwork with physical illness.

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 Martian Enquiry in DreamworkMargaret Bowater - 2 hour workshop

Margaret Bowater

Margaret is a registered Psychotherapist, a Teaching and Supervising Transactional Analyst, NZ Contact Person for the IASD. She is the author of the book "Dreams and Visions - Language of the Spirit" and of dozens of journal articles on dreamwork. Margaret is a Founding Co-Director of the Human Development and Training Institute of NZ, and of the Auckland TA Training Institute. She has led hundreds of dream workshops for counsellors, spiritual directors and others in NZ over 25 years; and continues to run a private practice in Auckland.

Abstract:

In most of our dreams we find ourselves as the Dream Ego (the conscious self) among other beings or objects in a setting where something unusual or disturbing is happening. A simple method to uncover meaning is for the counsellor to interview the dreamer in role as one (or more) of the _others_ in the dream. The counsellor becomes a kind of Martian explorer, respectfully trying to discover what’s going on here, thus allowing the dream to express itself more fully. Collaborative discussion after each role enables new insights to emerge.

Margaret will discuss some examples from her experience; demonstrate the process with one or two volunteer dreamers, and coach participants in a group process. The name comes from TA and the method is adapted from psychodrama, for use 1:1 or in small groups. It is a quick and effective way to clarify confusions and bring out deeper levels of meaning, often surprising, funny or very moving.

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 Dreaming of Nature and the Nature of DreamingKelly Bulkeley, PhD

Kelly Bulkeley, PhD

Kelly Bulkeley, Ph.D., is a Visiting Scholar at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California. He earned a doctorate in Religion and Psychological Studies from the University of Chicago Divinity School, an M.T.S. from Harvard Divinity School, and a B.A. from Stanford University. A former President of the International Association for the Study of Dreams and a Senior Editor of the APA journal Dreaming, he has written and edited several books on dream research. His most recent works are Teaching Jung (co-edited with Clodagh Weldeon) (Oxford University Press, 2011), Dreaming in the Classroom (co-authored with Philip King and Bernard Welt) (State University of New York Press, 2011), and Dreaming in Christianity and Islam (co-edited with Kate Adams and Patricia M. Davis) (Rutgers University Press, 2009).

Abstract:

Dreaming is an expression of human nature, and of humans-in-nature. Dreams reflect the deepest instinctual energies of the unconscious psyche and the greatest physical powers that shape our embodied reality. They teach us about the inner world and the outer world. This presentation will explore the many dimensions of nature that open up in our dream experiences. Combining religious and cultural history with new developments in cognitive science and database technology, I will discuss recurrent themes in people’s dreams about animals, the four elements, weather, and gravity. I will look at the variables of age, gender, and political ideology to see how they correlate with aspects of nature in dreaming. At the close of the presentation I will talk about the practical relevance of these findings: Can the insights of dreaming and dream research contribute to the cause of greater environmental awareness?

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 Dreams and Ceramic Art Joy Bye- 30 min paper

Joy Bye

I am a Ceramic artist. I have had numerous exhibitions and have been selected for the Blake Prize. I completed my Masters in Visual Arts in 2009, and I am presently studying for my PhD. I research at Sydney College of the Arts, University of Sydney.

Abstract:

The elusive experience of a dream has been a resource for artists, writers and poets since time immemorial. In this regard, it can be seen that the unconscious mind is an active agent in the creation of the imagination and artworks.

This talk will discuss aspects of my artistic practice incorporating dreams. I employ my dreams in the creation of ceramic sculptures. I record the dream on my iPod. I listen and make a written record of the dream. The dream is further explored using active imagination. I use drawing and collage methods to understand the dreams. Mainly I proceed by creating from the dream images that come to me in the process of making in clay.

Many artists have realised that the process by which the unconscious mind produces a dream - the dreamwork - is analogous to the process by which an artist creates metaphors and other symbolic forms. This realisation has influenced the critical examination of dreamwork and precipitated a self-conscious analysis of the creation of artwork in the studio.

Prior to the 20th century depictions of dreams often had a religious overtone. As the 20th century progressed however artists began to show their dreams in film, painting, photographs and sculptures that were fundamentally secular.

A parallel that has resulted from the art/dream analogy is the relationship between the subject presented in the artwork, that is its manifest content, and its interpretation -its latent content.

Collage as a medium coincides with the introduction of multilayered subject matter drawn from the unconscious mind. Artists have been able to construct the realm of sleep and dreams by removing fragments from their usual context and rearranging them into collages, montages, assemblages and combines.

Marc Chagall produced many images of dreams. Swiss painter Paul Klee created works known for their fantastic dream images. Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso both produced paintings called The Dream.

Contemporary artist Bill Viola’s installation The Sleep of Reason (1988) refers to Goya’s work famous work.

Many writers have explored dreams as a way of making their art. Author Graham Greene kept a dream diary during most of his life, to explore his characters and plots.

Presently I record my dreams using an iPod. Then I convert the dreams to a written form. Using this diary I explore the dream using the method of Active Imagination devised by Carl Jung. Other processes using my findings are making collages with papers. I continue by testing ideas using clay. Because clay is very plastic it enables me to interact with the symbols, emotions and visions that arise in the dream process. I continue the interaction by multiple firings and the addition of found pieces.

My work thus involves the exploration of theories of dream and their manifestation by artists and authors. Similarly, I study the theories of dreams historically and contemporarily. The knowledge gained thus informs my work.

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 A conversation with Peter Cameron, Artist in Residence, about Art and Imaginal SpacesPeter Cameron

Peter Cameron

I have been a professional artist for over 30 years, currently exhibiting and living in Sydney.

Abstract:

Painting, for me is often an act of revisioning or opening up new spaces in the psyche; this also occurs in dreaming. There are also strong similarities of process between dreaming and painting. In their creation and development they both rely on the use of memory, imagination, reflection and association. Sometimes we also may have the luck of a little synchronicity. It is at times an active, sometimes a passive process, with and without consequence. Painting can develop and stimulate areas of ourselves that sometimes can't find expression otherwise. Reflecting on images (and moving images) can be rewarding for individuals and collectives alike. Dreams can certainly open out much meaning for individuals and collectives.

There are various aspects to the construction of a painting. The initial foray could be seen as a process of active imagination. Or maybe it's an internal or external exploration, even a brief engagement with a 'participation mystique'. It can be put to use as an instrument or a discipline. Worked outside or just quietly 'thinking' into the paint in the studio. This thinking could be described variously as working with associations, memories, some analysis of space, colour and feeling tone. Sometimes the thinking is intellectual, at others it is actively haptic with materials. It may be a dialogue in the imagination that finds its realisation through the construction of figures, landscape, a temenos. There are endless possibilities. C.G. Jung took great care to paint his dreaming images. Some make physical constructions of dream images.

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 Sound and Imagination: Creative Meetings with the Unexpected. Dr Sven Doehner - 1 hour paper

Dr Sven Doehner

Sven Doehner, PhD, MFA, is a depth psychotherapist, teacher, workshop leader and writer. Born, raised and living in Mexico City, he trained in Archetypal Psychology with James Hillman and has guided workshops and training programs since 1981, in Mexico, Europe and North as well as South America. Director of the Instituto de Psicologa Profunda en Mexico since 1991, he blends Jungian-Archetypal Psychology with ancestral healing and spiritual practices, innovating experiences that give unexpected form to images in dreams (and life) through vocal sound sensitivity and work (emitting and listening) - thereby generating new somatic, emotional, mental and spiritual movements in the lives of those who work with him. He earned a PhD in Clinical Psychology, participated in the training program of the C.G. Jung Institute-Boston (six years), worked psychoanalytically with James Hillman (nine years), and trained in Bioenergetics and as a somatic movement educator in the School of BodyMindMovement. He has also worked (since 1986) with native Mayan, Zapotec and Mixtec healers in southern Mexico. In addition to a private practice in Mexico City, he is writing about his work: A Sound Imagination: creative meetings with the Unexpected".

Abstract:

Dream images challenge our neutrality, confronting us with the UNEXPECTED and inviting us to take a particular stance in our lives. Instead of referring back to what we already know, I propose sound ways to respond creatively to the challenges offered by the unexpected in our lives.

Some dreams appear to want us to get more involved in the actual experience of the plot, as much as deal with the personal issues suggesting that more than wanting to be interpreted and understood, dreams sometimes beg to be experienced. I propose new ways to have a moving waking-state experience of particular dream sequences.

As living metaphors, dream scenarios are a medium for presenting the dreamer with what is called for in order to bring new movements to his or her life. I propose that we respond to our dream images with an imaginative act: sound.

Before becoming an idea, an interpretation, or an abstraction the dream is a phenomenological experience: a vibration. SOUND (the audible aspect of vibration) can be imagined as a means to connect the dreamer with the dream experience in ways beyond the ego’s reach. Actually listening to the sounds that we make implies nurturing a palpable relationship with the invisible.

We generally (habitually) associate sound with something outside of ourselves, rather than something within us. But, if we pause to actually observe and differentiate our experience, we –sound. Underlying our discourse, the ways we sound give unexpected voice to certain wishes, thoughts, fears and desires, longings, hopes and expectations ...

Sound affects us in two fundamentally deep and parallel ways: at the same time that it dissolves that which is stuck: liberating, breaking, cleansing, and opening ... it coagulates that which is as yet diffuse and unrealized: giving form, limiting, organizing, and creating.

More than an idea, sound is an experience of what vibrates within us, an ongoing response to all sorts of outer stimuli. The correspondence between out and inner is made more clearly evident and can be more creatively discovered by a more differentiated awareness of our experience of our sounds.

A sensitivity to sound can be a way of opening and entering the dream-realm. Then there can be a shift in our focus, at the service of discovering something unexpectedly new through our emission of sound: inner sound-work Emitting the sounds that our images awaken in us is a constructive way of discovering and exploring that which vibrates in us in response to our dreams.

When we allow sound to emerge from our beings while resonating with our images, new images appear and old ones are re-valued no longer gripping us in the same way and the intimate, dynamic and transformative relationship between sound and image is revealed.

Inner sound-work leaves an indelible new imprint in our psyche. My invitation is to come into creative contact with the unexpected images that appear in our dreams and daily life because it is the unexpected that shifts our consciousness, and brings both inner and outer movement to our daily lives.

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 Kinaesthetic Modelling workshopSimon d'Orsogna - 2 hour workshop

Simon d'Orsogna

Simon works as a facilitator, writer, project consultant and coach, helping individuals and teams transform themselves and their organisations. He assists them to see bigger, more inclusive perspectives, to think in deeper and more creative ways about their problems, and how to collaborate to come up with collective ideas that no single person could ever think of on her own. His interests include pre-verbal knowing, social dreaming, kinaesthetic and body-centred approaches to generativity and co-creation. Seeing many change efforts miss the human dimension (e.g. just pouring more information-training-technology in), made Simon want to explore the transformational-adaptive aspects of adult learning. A variety of frameworks provide Simon with useful insights including systems, somatic and psychological approaches. He is currently studying adult developmental approaches to coaching with Bob Kegan and Lisa Lahey at Harvard University, MA.

Abstract:

A Kinaesthetic Modelling (KM) workshop is a hands-on, 3&4-D facilitated experiential learning activity. It gets us out of our cerebral, left-brain thinking approaches, and invites to interact with each other in different modes. The process is designed to tap each person's innate ability to imagine and express themselves visually, before words and concepts.

It is much easier to demonstrate than describe, and involves:

  • Thinking with your hands (communicating without words)
  • Manipulate, arrange, doodling manually with everyday 'back of drawer' objects: play dough, wire, coloured paper, tape, sticks, beads etc.
  • Make models and maps - images made concrete.
  • Then step back and look. (No, really, just LOOK!)
  • See pictures in the clouds.
  • Move from image to meaning.
  • New ideas and understandings emerge when the whole nervous system and both sides of the brain play together!

Kinaesthetic Modelling is a process by which people create metaphor out of physical objects. It invites pre-verbal hypothesis generation. People learn-and-create by doing, rather than by listening, speaking or reading.

We can understand the models as _thought artefacts_. For a short time after they are made, a group can use them as armatures for their thinking around an important specific issue, or to feel-see-hear something held collectively and not yet spoken. Because the thoughts are externalized in the form of simple objects, the thinker is less likely to feel vulnerable or be attacked for what she has made. And because the models are so unassuming they are easy to rearrange as ideas evolve. Collective effort creates a social experience both bridging and bonding.

Almost from the start, models are full of inspiration & practical suggestions, the products of many people thinking together simultaneously with their hands. Even in a brief exercise there is a wide range of thinking. Nothing seems to be off limits; and even hasty models can serve as springboards for rich discussions. A short modelling activity can generate some hours of powerful conversation.

French philosopher Gaston Bachelard’s asserted in Poetics of Space that the root of all our understanding of language is our original experience. The first time under water gives meaning to the word submerge. The first time in a dark closet gives meaning to the word enclosed. George Lakoff speaks about metaphor and meaning, saying as a cognitive scientist he used to think that with powerful enough computers they could characterize grammar and build translators. But he and others found, instead, that at the root of human meaning is our unique experience, not grammar, and that is indelibly idiosyncratic and personal. Arthur M. Young and his Theory of Process, insists that purpose and feeling come before thinking, and provide the substance that thought uses. Eugene Gendlin in Philosophy of the Implicit invites us to think in terms of the whole process and whole events, without ignoring great differentiation and without sacrificing precision-in-thinking.

Kinaesthetic Modelling is designed for thinking freshly in ‘struggly’ and wicked problems and works well in multi-sector and cross-organizational settings.

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 Explorations in Dreaming in the Land of Dreamtime from a Process Oriented PerspectiveJen Fox

Jen Fox

Jen Fox has worked as a psychotherapist in private practice for the past 28 years in Australia, New Zealand and USA. She is both interested in and guided by the imaginative possibilities of a life well lived.

Abstract:

Process Oriented Psychology or Process Work as it is now known is a multi-leveled awareness practice. 'Dreaming' from a Process Work perspective involves more than our nighttime dreams. This form of dreaming includes what is happening in the moment and that which is not noticed, disavowed or remains unformulated. 'Dreaming' signals itself through dreams, fantasies, body symptoms, relationship difficulties, conflicts and the environment. Flickering or fleeting feelings and sensations can be a portal into dreaming processes.

An example of an exploration and unfolding of a certain kind of 'dreaming' is discussed. This dreaming draws on experiences of 'spirit of place' and is both personal and cultural and historically embedded in various experiences of living in 'Australia'. The window into this dreaming began with barely perceptible feeling states that only became articulated after watching the film 'Rabbit Proof Fence'.

This paper is the written expression of a movement from unformulated feeling experiences into language through an unfolding stream of personal and cultural associations using film, story, poetry and painting. The creative journey itself helped to formulate and give shape to 'the dreaming'. This exploration illustrates the way Process Work uses awareness to track 'real' and 'imaginary' psychological and physical processes.

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 Under A Spell: Fairytales as Inspiration Sarah Gibson - 1 hour paper

Sarah Gibson

Sarah Gibson is an artist and filmmaker. Her latest project is Re-enchantment www.abc.net.au/re-enchantment. Her previous documentaries include The Hundredth Room and Myths of Childhood. She also lectures in Media Arts at the University of Technology, Sydney. Sarah is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Sydney. Sarah trained with ANZSJA and works clinically with adults, with a particular interest in sandplay and creativity.

Abstract:

A visual presentation exploring the ways contemporary artists are inspired by fairytale motifs, symbols and narratives. Drawing from her interactive project ‘Re-enchantment’ about the hidden world of fairy tales for adults, Jungian analyst and artist, Sarah Gibson brings together participating artists who re-imagine the stories: Bluebeard, Snow White, Hansel and Gretel, Cinderella, Rapunzel and Red Riding Hood. Sarah explores different approaches to engaging imaginatively with the psychological and cultural resonance of fairytales. She reflects on her own character Red Girl who appears in her own paintings and her own creative process

Imagining Climate Change Sally Gillespie; Dr Jonathan Marshall; Dr Lisa Roberts - 2 hr panel

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 Climate Change: Conversations, Dreams and Imaginings

Sally Gillespie

Sally Gillespie is a doctoral candidate at the University of Western Sydney researching 'Climate Change and Psyche: Myths, Dreams and Imaginings of the Climate Change Era'. She is the author of 'Living the Dream', '’The Book of Dreaming' and co-author of 'The Knot of Time’. She also contributed to 'Depth Psychology, Disorder and Climate Change' edited by Jonathan Marshall. Sally was in private practice as a Jungian psychotherapist for over twenty years, facilitating dream groups as well as teaching dreamwork methods to counsellors. She was President of the CG Jung Society of Sydney from 2006 to 2010

Abstract:

Climate change is a highly challenging and often contested topic that many people find hard to think about or discuss, as its provocative implications readily trigger psychological defences, such as denial, disassociation, splitting and projection. In response to observing these processes at work in myself and others in both public and private life I resolved to facilitate and participate in a discussion group committed to focusing on climate change and related issues with the goal of exploring our conscious and unconscious psychological responses.

In 2011 our participatory research group met over a span of seven months to talk as honestly and openly as possible about our feelings and thoughts in response to escalating climate change news and reports. We shared dreams and imaginings, and explored confusions, frustrations, griefs, hopes and fears within the context of our personal and professional lives. The tenets of depth psychology helped shape our journey as we focused on our unconscious responses and reflected upon personal and collective myths - present and emergent. In this paper I will present a map charting the terrain of some of our most significant conversations as well as vignettes from our journey. I finish by reflecting on the value of sharing dreams within group discussions that inquire into our relationships to community, world and unconscious processes.

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 Technology and Ecology as Waking Dreams: Geo-engineering and the Unconscious

Dr Jonathan Marshall

Jonathan Paul Marshall currently works as a QEII Research Fellow at the University of Technology Sydney. He has written about the history of alchemy, online community, online gender, the failure of computer software and the psychology of climate change. Books include, as author, ‘Jung, Alchemy and History’ and ‘Living on Cybermind: Categories, Communication and Control’, and as editor ‘Depth Psychology, Disorder and Climate Change’. He has also been a failed avant-rock musician, playwright and novelist.

Abstract:

Douglas Fawcett proposed that we should understand the cosmos as a largely unconscious imaginative process, rather than just as a working out of logos or reason as has traditionally been the case in Western Philosophy. The cosmos, when seen as imagination, is inherently driven by association, flux and transformation, with unexpected combinations and dynamic consequences. It is a world of light and of shadow; logos and mythos together, even if they conflict, or undermine each other. As such, the world can be taken as a poem or a dream, pregnant with clashing and ambiguous meanings.

The things or events we notice as a group or individual tend to be those things or events which imply meaning for us, or which become captured by unconscious processes that can transcend us. Sometimes the meaning will be hidden, sometimes it will be compensatory, and sometimes it can lead to creative responses. This paper takes both Fawcett’s idea and Jungian dream theory to explore the paradoxical fantasies hidden in the way we respond to technology and the environment; particularly in the fantasies of technological response to climate change, which suggest that we hope to manage the world through discipline and clear thinking alone. If the world is imagination and waking dream, then such an apparently rational approach will be disastrous, being disrupted by compensations and unexpected psychological events. In our imagination and dream we seem caught between technology as both a potential solution and as a trigger of catastrophe. Ecology can likewise be dreamt as hostile or as ultimate harmony. If we take technology and ecology as our social dream, and sit within the contradictions, then perhaps we can listen to its messages, and reach a new position from which to begin again.

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 Expanding perceptions through collaborative animation practice

Dr Lisa Roberts

I am passionate about using art to make a difference. Collaborations with scientists and other artists have evolved from shared interests in understanding climate change. Formal studies include dance, visual arts, animation, Indigenous perspectives and Antarctic perceptions. My PhD research was practice-based and led to the development of a lexicon of primal gestural forms that are circling, spiralling and crossing. The forms are used in animation and other media to combine scientific data with expressions of connection. Animations and other artworks are presented online and at international art and science conferences and exhibitions. My animations are published under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non-commercial-Share Alike 3.0 Copyright license at Antarctic Animation, Creature Cast, and Living Data.

Abstract:

There is an urgent need to connect scientific knowledge of climate change to what we experience and believe. The view that art, science and spirituality are parts of one knowledge system is holistic. I propose that a collaborative animation practice can be used to combine these ways of knowing. Animation is the art of change and transformation, the qualities that define life, or spirit. The primal forms of circling, spiraling and crossing have been used since ancient times to embody knowledge of these forces. The forms are found in data sets and iconography that symbolise natural systems and embodied knowledge of them. When used to combine different ways of knowing, the primal forms can literally animate changes in perception.

Animations are made with data, iconography and stories that are shared by scientists and other artists. I use drawing and dance to generate animations that reflect shared knowledge. This collaborative practice works through symbiotic relationships that develop with people, face-to-face and on-line. In this paper, I will present animations that show how a collaborative practice works to expand understandings and imaginings of the ecosystem by giving voice to many sensory responses that people have made to its changing nature. I will focus on collaborations with dancers and on the animation that has expanded perceptions of Antarctic krill, the key species of the marine ecosystem. This collaborative animation practice exemplifies the kind of shift towards collective knowledge production that is essential for advancing understanding of climate change.

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 Dream Lines, Life Lines, Song Lines Jodine Grundy

Jodine Grundy

Jodine Grundy, M.Ed, L.P.C., Cincinnati Ohio, USA, is a past President & current Board Chair of the International Association for the Study of Dreams. An active leader in IASD for 15 years she has chaired many committees including Membership and Regional Events. The development of an international Regional Representative network and international events is a strong focus of her work. A graduate of Santa Clara University, CA and University of Cincinnati, OH she is a professional psychotherapist and life & leadership coach. Earlier careers include sustainable farming and entrepreneurial enterprises. As a political & environmental activist & leader she works for a sustainable future through many volunteer non-profit organizations she has initiated or led. These include Rural Resources, Ohio Ecological Food & Farm Association, Citizens for a Better Goshen, Cincinnati, USA- Kharkiv, Ukraine Sister City Project, Ohio Democratic Women’s Caucus, and the Green Partnership for Greater Cincinnati.

Abstract:

Dreams arise from life and life emerges from dreams in the life of an individual at personal and collective levels. This presentation will offer an autobiographical view of the interweave of key dreams themes, dream lines and significant life paths & patterns, life lines as recorded in more than 30 years of dream journals. A trajectory or life path manifests as this develops, both for self and community.

An individual life with its unique history, dream vocabulary and motifs is always embedded in the fields of nature and collective psychic life. So, while the personal dreamline lifeline story merits attention for its own sake, the purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate how deep reflection & action upon one’s personal experience leads to constellation of a collective, archetypal pattern. This pattern, or pathway, may be called a songline, a term borrowed from the Alcheringa, the Dreamtime of the aboriginal Australian people. In the Dreamtime world, dream and life are one in archetypal creation whose continuous presence in psyches, rituals and landscape for 50,000 years serves to sustain and guide the world of these aboriginal people, living custodians of their songlines.

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 Embodied Imagination Practice in an Australian setting Jennifer Hume, Michelle Morris, Mary Murray, Jessica Rose, Patricia Rose - 1 hour paper

Abstract:

To give insights into the Embodied Imagination method and different perspectives on its application Aim: To involve participants in a lively session on techniques of Embodied Imagination and diverse ways this is being used to work with dream images in Australian clinical and cultural practice. Embodied Imagination (EI) is a therapeutic and creative way to work directly with images in dreams and memories and acknowledges their embodied reality. Rather than interpreting or analyzing them, the approach is to encounter them directly as ‘other’ while maintaining a state of dual consciousness. It is a relatively new approach, developed by Robert Bosnak building on many bases including neuroscience, the phenomenological work of Carl Jung and chaos and complexity theory. It has broad application in working with memories, chronic illness, pain management, relationship issues and exploring cultural paradigms. It can be utilized with both adults and children

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 Getting to Topic: PhD’s, Dreaming and the Hermeneutic Circle Dr Claire Jankelson - 45 min paper

Dr Claire Jankelson

Claire is currently teaching research and offering hermeneutic circle group supervision with PhD students at MGSM. She has been a tertiary educator for decades with a particular interest in engagement in learning, researching and educating and therefore leadership in the learning process. Claire is President of the non-profit organisation Spirituality, Leadership and Management (SLaM) and editor of the journal JSLaM. With an interest in facilitation, groups and dialogue, she participated in a rich dream group over about 7 years.

Abstract:

Over the past 4 years, a group of PhD candidates at a Management School have been meeting monthly in a circle for conversation, supervision and learning about researching for doctoral writing. The circle invites participation on relevant topics of research content as well as the process of engaging with writing a thesis. In a hermeneutic circle experience and method integrate into content and topic therefore is shaped through interaction and understanding. Each person is a conduit for one another’s learning; each person dives deeper into articulating and shaping their own areas of research. The intersubjective space created both shapes and is shaped by deepening understanding and insight into the topic at hand.

Hermeneutics is an ancient biblical research method of interpreting meaning by making sense of or reaching towards understanding of a word or phrase through appreciating the context of the particular word or phrase. Understanding thereby arises from within the context of the phenomenon in question rather than interpreting or imposing meaning or understanding. Heidegger, Gadamer and Ricoeur have been the major developers of hermeneutics as a methodology (and ontology) in the social sciences.

Doing research and especially writing a thesis is not only about method, literature review, developing a question in detachment from being, but is rather a way of being (ontology) within the world. The circle is the opportunity to practice this way of being and develop a kind of research attunement. It is this attunement that has profound similarities to the engagement that occurs in a dream group space.

In dreamgroups circles, the focus is profoundly on staying with the phenomena of the dream that is being shared. Interpretation and understanding arise out of the circle. This means inviting the concomitant emotions, the discomfort and the silences between words. Through each person that is present staying with the phenomena and content of the dream, the topic slowly comes into focus and makes itself known. Eventually understanding seems to manifest about the phenomenon or topic of the dream, sometimes accompanied by heightened emotions. The process brings insight for all participants and not only the dream sharer.

Having participated in dream group circles and been a supervisor for the hermeneutic circle, I’m interested to explore the nature of the intersubjective space that occurs in both circles. Both carry the intention of deepening and understanding the topic at hand. Particular areas of comparison include the quality of intersubjective space; the shaping of the phenomenon, deepening of topic; the nature of reaching towards understanding; the insights that occur; the nature of arising synchronicity and the relationship building.

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 Working with DreamsCraig Jarman - 90 min workshop

Craig Jarman

Craig Jarman has been running dream groups for over 25 years, with a key focus on archetypal symbolism and Jungian psychology. His website may found at www.dreamanalysis.info

Abstract:

Dreaming is one of life’s the most fascinating experiences. At the same time it is one of the most perplexing. So often we know that a dream is trying to tell us something but still it's meaning eludes us. It's language appears strange yet familiar. If our unconscious mind is trying to tell us something why doesn't it just come right out and say it? Why the puzzle instead of the picture?

Well that would be too easy. Dreams are riddles rather than statements. They ask us a question hoping that we search and find the answer to ourselves. Dreams aim to broaden our mind, to teach us what is beyond our comprehension. If a dream were to speak directly to our present state of consciousness then all would be easily understood _ yet nothing would be discovered. A dream is by necessity a mystery. Through presenting us with what we are unconscious of, the dream leads us on toward greater Self-awareness.

Our dreams are one step ahead of our current awareness. They dance within the twilight zone of consciousness, teasing us to step forward into the darkness of our being. It is for this reason that Freud described the dream as the 'royal road to the unconscious'.

The dream serves as the guide. As Jung explained, the dream carries the wisdom of our greater Self. To interpret your dreams is to travel this royal road. In pursuing the dream discover that which we are personally, culturally and, eventually, collectively unaware of.

Based upon the principles of Jungian dream analysis, this workshop will outline the key steps required to tackle the riddle of the dream and unlock the message contained therein.

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 Using Dreams and Imagination to Respond Creatively to Ecological Degradation (Kangaloon Creative Ecologies Panel)Prof Kumi Kato; Kim Satchell; Lorraine Shannon (PhD) - 90 min Panel

Prof Kumi Kato

Kumi Kato is professor of environmental studies at Wakayama University, Japan. She is also an Honorary Associate Professor at The University of Queensland, and research affiliate at Cheju National University, South Korea. Her work is best described as concerned with _creative ideas & expressions for sustainability. She is especially interested in the role of sounds in articulating human-nature connectivity. Through her multi-disciplinary approach, she sees herself as a positive activist, who acts on building on people’s strength, good will, trust, celebration, beauty and joy.

Abstract:

This paper consists of commentary in conjunction with a PowerPoint presentation of natural scenes that form a powerful connection with our imagination and senses

These scenes include:

  • Tamayura –玉響 (dew resonance) a drop of dew on a leaf in early morning before sunrise, which will stay only for a short time and be gone by the time the world wakes up
  • Sanshisuimei - 山紫水明 a mountain range glows in the purple pink sunlight, and reflects in the clear water in a serene silence
  • Shinonome – 東雲 (east cloud) just before the sunrise, the lower edge of the clouds become pink, just before the entire Eastern sky emerges in the light. It is still dark and things can be only seen as silhouettes
  • Shimonokane – 霜の鐘 (frost bell) the total silence of a cold night with sharp clear air – it is so crystal clear you can hear the sound of frost forming
  • Ukō – 雨香 fragrant rain) the fresh smell of flowers and plants brought out just before the rain starts to fall

These are the moments of beauty, serenity and ephemerality can only be ‘seen’ if we listen attentively with all our senses. They are the moments of a-wa-re - when we are so moved by the transient fragility of things passing, both human and non-human. Perhaps with such mindful listening, we can capture a peaceful space that actually exists in every part of our life.

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 Regaining Consciousness: A Field GuideKim Satchell

Kim Satchell

Kim Satchell is a Mid -North Coast of New South Wales surfer, poet, performer, writer and academic based at Southern Cross University Coffs Harbour with Centre for Peace and Social Justice and the School of Arts and Social Sciences. His research interests are in Cultural Studies and the Ecological Humanities particularly concerning the literature of place and ecology. Co-editor of Kurungabaa: A Journal of Literature, History and Ideas from the Sea http://kurungabaa.net/ and a founding member of Kangaloon, a fellowship of creative scholars who have made a commitment to collaborating on issues of love and death in the Anthropocene. http://www.kangaloon.org/. Kangaloon is a fellowship of poets, scholars, artists and activists who respond through their creative endeavours to ecological degradation, escalating extinctions and the diminishment of life with vision, hope and love. By creating art, writing and scholarship from the depth of nature we search for ways in which we and other species might live and live well.

Abstract:

In this paper, I contemplate creative research methods and everyday practices in a recursive manner, to posit a methodology for the transformation of everyday life through creative pursuits. Drawing from self-directed field and archival work, I discuss the productive tension between dream life and everyday life. The work employs the practice of walking as journeying, refers to various guides, photographs, found objects, journaling, dreams and contemplation, as research modalities for creative work. The sacred geography encountered through these walks becomes the field of inquiry for a sophisticated understanding of the sentient world, of human and more-than human encounters with place.

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 Who’s Afraid of Big White Wolves?Dr Lorraine Shannon

Dr Lorraine Shannon

LORRAINE SHANNON is a free-lance writer, academic editor, craft bookmaker and award-winning gardener. She holds a PhD in postcolonial studies and has just recently completed a non-traditional PhD in nature writing. She has published articles in such Journals as The Australian Humanities Review, PAN, The Journal of Ecocriticism (forthcoming) and the Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism (forthcoming) and essays in Island Magazine, Orion, and Resurgence. She writes on the poetics of human-animal and human-plant relations and runs The Epicurean Backyard dedicated to a hybrid mix of gardening and activism that reclaims the collapse between daily life, creative rebellion and the ethical pleasure of growing food in urban spaces. She is a co-founder of Kangaloon: Creative Ecologies.

Abstract:

This paper returns to Freud’s famous patient, the Wolf Man and his dream of white wolves in a walnut tree outside his bedroom window to reinterpret this dream-scene from a more-than-human perspective. This reinterpretation understands the wolves, not as split-off parts of the child Wolf Man’s voyeuristic psyche but as phenomenological realities in their own right.

I ask, what do the wolves want? Do they really want to be humanised, psychologised, oedipalised? Are they forced to present themselves through the symptom, only to meet a machinery of psychological interpretations that refuses their autonomy, their phenomenality?

Or have they presented themselves out of a desire to open the possibility of a bridge between the animal and human worlds, to (re) gain recognition as equals, to beseech us to reassess the process of imagining? Although silent they claim us, just as they claimed the Wolf Man, calling us to wake up, relinquish psychopathology and pursue the dream of a poetic ecology.

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 Dreaming and Liminality: Examining the ways dreams helps us cross a life-changing threshold. Dr Geoffrey Navara - 30 min paper

Dr Geoffrey Navara

Geoffrey S. Navara, PhD is Assistant Professor of Psychology at Trent University in Peterborough, Ontario, Canada, specializing in family relationships and the communication of cultural values and beliefs. His interests include the qualitative analysis of narratives and how individuals make meaning of these stories.

Abstract:

Many have positioned that there is a connection between the dream and the waking worlds, and that dreams can provide insight in the waking life (e.g., King &DeCicco, 2009). Using the Story Telling Method (STM) (DeCicco, 2007) the current study examined 442 separate dreams of university students transitioning from their last semester of undergraduate studies to their next career stage. Liminal dreams and their waking discoveries were qualitatively analyzed and connections made between their dream lives and life transitions.

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 Jung: Alchemy, History and ImaginationDr Jonathan Marshall

Dr Jonathan Marshall

Jonathan Paul Marshall currently works as a QEII Research Fellow at the University of Technology Sydney. He has written about the history of alchemy, online community, online gender, the failure of computer software and the psychology of climate change. Books include, as author, ’Jung, Alchemy and History’ and ’Living on Cybermind: Categories, Communication and Control’, and as editor, ‘Depth Psychology, Disorder and Climate Change’. He has also been a failed avant-rock musician, playwright and novelist.

Abstract:

Jung both revolutionised and made respectable the study of alchemy, by suggesting that the obscurity and oddness of alchemical works expressed universal unconscious processes also active in contemporary people with no interest in, or knowledge of, alchemy. This suggestion enabled Jung to further illustrate and develop his ideas about 'individuation' and dreaming, and, as a result, alchemy and its images became central to his mature work. The luxuriant and complex imagery of Western alchemy can be seen as a kind of collective dream and as compensation for the official symbology of Christianity

Since Jung's day there has been a great deal of research into the history of alchemy and it is now helpful to see how well Jung's ideas hold up in the light of this research. This talk aims to sketch some of the ways that Jung and the Post-Jungians (such as James Hillman), refer to alchemy in their writings and work, and to elaborate these ideas within more recent developments in the understanding of alchemy.

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 Mandala of Dreams Felicity Oswell - 2 hour workshop

Felicity Oswell

Felicity is a multi-faceted individual, artist, group worker, teacher, tour guide and dancer. She has developed her own unique style of group work and workshops. Her studies in Buddhism and its iconography, Eastern Dance forms and their philosophies were complimented by her studies in Psychotherapy, Art therapy, bodywork, healing, Community Arts and social work in Australia. For 18 years she worked in prisons as a counsellor, group worker and artist. She also draws on her long relationship with Japan where for over 20 years she has been guiding groups including UTS Design and Architectures tours and facilitating Mandala and dance workshops. She currently is a teacher at TAFE in Community Services and works on many creative community development projects with disadvantaged in Sydney. She facilitates the 21 Praises of Tara Mandala dance group and is a Hilal dancer. Felicity is also the creator of the Wombmoon Calendar.

Abstract:

Each person lives in his or her own Mandala.

The Mandala you create in this workshop is an expression of the universe in yourself, in this case, the inner universal self. Using the theory and practice of a Mandala, we will start with the place from which all dreams and life itself emanate, the centre, and using collage and art materials, build the palace of your dreams. Your mandala reflects the individual and universal patterns of time and space. Like a mirror, the interface between dream life and everyday life create relationships that are fertile with a rich meaning and symbolism.

This creative process uses the symbolic landscape or our day and night life and reveals messages and support to the dreamer when the invisible manifests. Expressing the centre of your soul out to the limits of perception culminates in integration of the disparate elements of the dream / life. When you want to meet the potential self, when you are willing and longing for change, the Mandala may give you the wisdom and courage to develop into a new stage. It's because your potential is already in you.

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 Ancestral Visitations Unto The Fourth Generation: A clinical investigation of intergenerational transmission of trauma through the dreams of children of survivors Dr Judith Pickering - 45 min paper

Dr Judith Pickering

Dr Judith Pickering is a Jungian Analyst, Psychoanalytic Couple Therapist and Psychotherapist. She is Vice President of The Australian and New Zealand Association of Jungian Analysts and a faculty member for the Australia and New Zealand Association of Psychotherapy. She is the author of ‘Being in Love: Therapeutic Pathways Through Psychological Obstacles to Love’. A second book, ‘Transformations in Love’ will be published in 2012. She has published widely in Psychoanalysis and presented plenary papers, lectures and workshops in Australia, USA, and Europe.

Abstract:

A clinical investigation of intergenerational transmission of trauma through the dreams of children of survivors

A patient brings a dream series featuring an empty swimming pool. Fragments of the bones of infants lie scattered around the concrete floor. A young man has dreams of a prison cell in Changi. His individuation is blocked until he visits his dying father who tells of his experiences as a prisoner of war. A woman brings dreams of starvation and barren fields. Her father came to Australia as a refugee, his family perished in the Ukrainian Holodomor.

The cultural unconscious of Australia features themes of alienation attendant upon histories of displacement, migration and re-settlement. Themes of exile, motifs such as that of a _lost child_ alone in an inhospitable, eerie landscape pervade the literature, painting and music of Australia's post-colonial history.

Many migrants arrived in Australia having fled torture and war, driven from their homes, villages, and countries. They sought to make the new country and their children’s lives a place free of trauma that was unimaginable and literally unspeakable.

Yet disavowed traumatic experience haunts the dreams of their children and their children’s children. One child is chosen to redeem the past, unconsciously entering therapy through the need to uncover past secrets, to piece together an ancestral cultural history, before the stories and the keys to comprehending their terrible inheritance die with their forebears. The offspring of victims of trauma may be carriers for that which was too horrific for their ancestors to work through. Such material will haunt the analytic space until it is uncovered, witnessed, mourned and so eventually symbolized. In some cases patients did not consciously know their psychic inheritance. Yet their dreams transmit an unknown story, alerting them to something they sensed but did not consciously know.

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 Borrowed ImaginationLeonie Reisberg - 45 min paper

Leonie Reisberg

Leonie Reisberg is an arts psychotherapist and the Director of KidsLink, a social skills program for children and adolescents. Leonie has been a practising art therapist for over 25 years. She holds a Masters degree in Art Therapy from the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York, as well as a Masters degree in Fine Art Photography from the Art Institute of Chicago. Leonie has worked with a wide range of client populations in both individual and group settings using art therapy as a treatment modality. She has served as an adjunct lecturer in art therapy at LaTrobe University in Melbourne and at the Pratt Institute, CW Post University and the College of New Rochell in New York.

Abstract:

The focus of my work with hundreds of children with Asperger's Syndrome has been to assist them in developing greater inner flexibility and imaginative tools to enable them to make authentic contact with their peers. In my program I have been able to help these children connect with each other though ‘borrowed’ imaginative experiences (from mythology, history and media), which they frequently share in common. I will present art work and describe several processes to demonstrate how these children take these borrowed imaginative experiences, make them uniquely their own, and use them to forge better social connections with their peers.

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 A Slice of TimeLeonie Reisberg - 90 min workshop

Abstract:

Many of us in our youth have imagined a possible life path projected into the future. The sources of this may either be obvious or may be a total mystery. It is important to see how this early self-concept may influence our choices in making the next step forward. In Whitrow's view, the notion of time is primitive, consisting of a quantitative and qualitative stream of simultaneous outer and inner events.

If we look at life as being a series of slices of time that are built upon by experiences, adding what we learnt from the previous slice onto the next we form a continuum or foundation for further deepening of our self understanding as well as our understanding of others and the world around us. We develop our own "pentimento" as layer upon layer builds throughout our lives. Within this process we may become what we conceived in this early image or we may instead realize that there is a truer path that needs to be fully developed and realised.

In this workshop participants will have an opportunity to visually explore their own timelines that carry images, messages, feelings and relationships that have influenced their personal evolution. Using several copies of photos that have been taken throughout their life up to the present combined with various art materials a creative exploration of how one slice of time is connected to another will emerge.

This process will provide an opportunity for the participants to gain insight into how these earlier self-images have been utilised to form their present selves.

In Dreams the Land Speaks to usJody Grundy; Erla Ronan, Ben Zion Weiss (PhD) - 2 hour panel

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 Dream Medicine Gardens: Wild & Cultivated

Jody Grundy

Jodine Grundy, M.Ed, L.P.C., Cincinnati Ohio, USA, is a past President & current Board Chair of the International Association for the Study of Dreams. An active leader in IASD for 15 years she has chaired many committees including Membership and Regional Events. The development of an international Regional Representative network and international events is a strong focus of her work. A graduate of Santa Clara University, CA and University of Cincinnati, OH she is a professional psychotherapist and life & leadership coach. Earlier careers include sustainable farming and entrepreneurial enterprises. As a political & environmental activist & leader she works for a sustainable future through many volunteer non-profit organizations she has initiated or led. These include Rural Resources, Ohio Ecological Food & Farm Association, Citizens for a Better Goshen, Cincinnati, USA- Kharkiv, Ukraine Sister City Project, Ohio Democratic Women’s Caucus, and the Green Partnership for Greater Cincinnati

Abstract:

The theme of this symposium “ In Dreams the Land Speaks to Us” aptly describes the presenter’s lifetime experience of dreams whose primary theme is just this, the earth speaking through dream images. This is not surprising for someone whose ancestors were farmers and master gardeners and waking life experiences were intimately involved with horticulture, farming and deep love of nature in its wild state. What is surprising is the series of very specific medicine garden dreams that arose over a more than two-decade period with unique and compelling images and historic dates and information conveyed about which there was no previous conscious knowledge or study.

What is the earth itself saying through these dreams and why is it important to listen and act on their messages? Why would unusual images from a foreign indigenous culture, the aboriginal culture of Australia, arise in the dreaming of a Western woman with no immediate experience or previous interest in that culture? A riveting central dream image of Great Red Kangaroo in the middle of a medicine garden remains both enigmatic and compelling, calling the dreamer to inner and outer journeys to understand and activate the medicine of this dream. Why would this dreamer’s medicine garden dreams increase in frequency and specificity as to dates of their cultivation from a 1545 medicine garden at the University of Padua, Italy to the Japanese Bonsai tree growing continuously since 5th century, opening a gateway to Zen gardens of reflection? What do concentric rings of community gardens planted by progressive generations of gardeners, showing the passage of time like growth rings in trees say to those listening to the earth dreaming now, now in the anthropocene era where all nature is inexorably affected by humankind?

The dreamer/presenter will share several of these dreams and suggest that the urgency to sustain the life of the earth itself is manifesting in these and others’ dreams of the land in which the earth is communicating the medicine needed for survival and healing of the ecosphere. The image of the medicine garden is a unique place in which the wild and cultivated are held in dynamic tension, manifesting problem and solution, dis-ease and medicine.

Further, this presentation will explore possible reasons for repetitive, cross-cultural and historic dreaming of the medicine garden motif: the need to seek ancient aboriginal roots and sustainable relations to earth and her creatures in a world- wide and communal context and collective action.

As part of the exquisitely interconnected web of life of the earth itself we can consciously listen to the earth dreaming through us, the animals and other life forms that speak in our dreams. This deep listening can guide us to the ethical choices and care for the entire web of life so critically needed now. This eco-psychological approach places individual and collective psychology and development in an appropriate matrix of awareness and action.

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 Do we Call the Land? Does the Land Call Us?

Erla Ronan

Erla Ronan holds a Master of Arts (Cultural Psychologies); Masters of Business Administration; Diploma Social Science (Psychology) BA (Hons). She is Vice President of the C G Jung Society of New South Wales, a dream group practitioner, and dream workshop presenter.

Abstract:

Carl Jung observed that people projected psychic states into the landscape - into Nature - in order to integrate and assimilate their own psychic processes. Eco-psychologist, Theodore Roszak, contends that we are at one with the earth. In Australia, while traditional custodians of the land had a rich symbology associated with their particular country, new settlers from the 1780s onwards represented initial relationship to the land as a battle with the unknown.

Over several decades of living and working in different parts of Australia, I experienced a series of dream images associating totemic images with different parts of the country. In this presentation I reflect on these dreams and associated synchronistic experiences, to encourage a deeper consideration of the complexities of sense of place, spirit of place and sense of belonging. Paying attention to dream images and associated synchronistic events, through personal work and work in dream groups, I conclude that the dream image has becomes an agent of change.

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 Changing the Dream, Awakening the Dreamer

Dr Ben-Zion Weiss

Ben is a community educator in social ecology, meditation, yoga, drama, ESOL, cross-cultural conflict and non-violence training. He lectures and tutors at University of Western Sydney, consults for Multicultural Programs in Cooling Conflicts and inter-cultural programs and presents the Change the Dream Symposium. His PhD research is on anti-racism drama education for youth/youth workers. It develops a theory of an ecology of culture. He presents at conferences, facilitates workshops for youth workers, teachers and community workers; leads Dances of Universal Peace and facilitates dialogues in spiritual ecology. He’s a student of creative mysticism, especially Zen, Kabbalah and Sufism. His current book on creativity is based on his thesis and he has written chapters, poems and papers for other publications.

Abstract:

This session is an introduction to the work of the Pachamama Alliance and the Changing the Dream, Awakening the Dreamer symposium. The purpose of the Symposium: Bringing forth an environmentally sustainable, spiritually fulfilling, socially just human presence on this planet.

The Symposium’s goal is to wake participants up from the dream of the modern world we are living in, to identify the unexamined assumptions that create and maintain the dream, and begin to appreciate the extraordinary possibilities emerging at this time in history. Through participation in this program, people are encouraged to find their unique and powerful role as agents of change in creating a new future. Since its launch in San Francisco in March 2005, the Symposium has spread rapidly, reaching hundreds of thousands of people in 50 countries on six continents.

The Pachamama Alliance was born in response to a request from the Achuar, an indigenous people deep in the Amazon region of Ecuador. The Achuar had a dream that a great threat was coming to them. As a result they made the courageous decision to seek a partnership with people from the industrialized world who would work with them in protecting their rainforest home and their traditional way of life. Out of this unique partnership, it has become evident that indigenous wisdom and insight offer enormous value in addressing the complex issues that we face in our modern world. See the website for more information: http://www.pachamama.org/about/

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 An interactive art installation. (Dr Lisa Roberts) Pattern Recognition, Primal Forms, Dreams, and Climate ChangeLisa Roberts

Lisa Roberts

Lisa has worked collaboratively with scientists and other artists who have shared interests in understanding climate change. She is passionate about using art to make a difference. Her formal studies include dance, visual arts, animation, Indigenous perspectives and Antarctic perceptions. Her PhD research was practice-based and led to the development of a lexicon of primal gestural forms that are circling, spiraling and crossing. The forms are used in animation and other media to combine scientific data with expressions of connection. Animations and other artworks are presented online and at international art and science conferences and exhibitions. Her animations are published under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non-commercial-Share Alike 3.0 Copyright license at Antarctic Animation, Creature Cast, and Living Data.

Abstract:

Dr Lisa Roberts presents an interactive art installation with sound, image and dance to lead into an imaginal space and encounter with primal forms and shapes that are connected to land, environment and other media to combine scientific data with expressions of connection.

Lisa writes, ‘When I was pregnant with my first child, I had a recurring dream, of painting a picture and at the same time being part of the picture. The dream found form, to some extent, in paintings that I made at the time. But the bodily experience of moving through time that I remember in my dreams was missing. Now the dream is embodied in this installation. Animated circling, spiraling and crossing forms identify scientific data that describe natural systems, and iconography crafted by artists that embody sensory connection to them’.

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 Healing Dragon DreamsJeremy Seligson - 45 min paper

Jeremy Seligson

Indiana University JD 1970, US Peace Corps Ethiopia 1970-1972, Teaching at Korean Universities 1978-2008.Author ‘Oriental Birth Dreams’,’ Korean Dreams From Womb to Tomb’ (forthcoming), Regional Representative IASD for Asia Pacific

Abstract:

This presentation will offer series of pictures of dragons in Korean dreams. This symbol of the dragon is deeply rooted in the psychic of the Korean people and occurs frequently in dreams. Ordinarily to dream of a dragon is a great matter of joy to the dreamer. For it portends good fortune. Good fortune can be in the form of a child, a new spouse, passage of an important examination, even the promotion to becoming prime minister, or it may contain the clue to curing an illness. The dragon lives in the sea, in the earth, in the lake, on the trees, in the clouds, and finally up in Heaven. In short, the dragon represents all of nature and all the powers therein. To harness the powers of the dragon is to have a hand on the reins of the transformation, especially of oneself physically and mentally. Much of this paper concerns experiments the presenter has conducted upon himself and efforts to likewise transform his body and mind during times of weakness and ailing. Some of the presentation will be dramatized so as to further authenticate the presence in nature of the dragon in Korean personal mythology.

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 Invitation to Dream a Healing Dream Jeremy Seligson- 1 hour workshop

Abstract:

In this presentation, I will share in conversation, and through storytelling, a series of healing dreams that I also speak about of as, ‘Dreams that Came True’. These series of dreams are part of a larger book project on, ‘Dreams from Womb to Tomb’. Students enrolled in an English language course at Hansung University, Seoul, collected these healing dreams from family members.

The dream narratives tell stories of meetings with family ancestors, of receiving guidance and assistance with healing, or with preparing to meet the passage of death. Sometimes, the dreams give early warning, bringing awareness to physical states of un-wellness and disease. Occasionally, healing medicine tonics and elixirs appear as dream gifts or sought-after hidden treasures.

I invite you, as you listen to these dreams, as with any good story, to engage deeply and to allow the inner imaginal space for the stories, images and symbols to catalyse your own healing dream imagery and stories. We will also consider these dreams in the context of a cross-cultural dialog, and consider how the cultural valuing of dream sharing and dream telling is a transformational factor affecting a personal sense of identity, social relationships, and a broader sense of relationship to nature and the environment.

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 Story telling: Dreams within Story and Story within DreamsDonna Jacobs Sife

Donna Jacobs Sife

Donna Jacobs Sife is a writer, award-winning storyteller and peace -worker. From the United Nations to Woodford Folk Festival, her considerable international reputation is built on her capacity to bridge difference – be it within our societies, our communities or ourselves. For nearly two decades she has travelled widely throughout the world teaching and telling stories. She is drawn to stories that hold within them truths that are beyond time and space, that provide ancient images that awaken lost memories within ourselves and our psyches. She tells to uplift the spirit, to awaken hope and to celebrate the soul. Donna draws from all traditions, and in doing so she takes pleasure in both the unique elements held within different cultures, and the golden thread that links them all.

Abstract:

Acclaimed storyteller, Donna Jacobs Sife, shares stories of Dreams within Story and Story within Dreams. In this lively and engaging session, we explore ‘dream’ from the multiple perspectives of personal and spiritual narratives and the imaginal realms of myth, folk and fairytale.

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 Chakradance - Rhythm for your SoulNatalie Southgate and Douglas Channing - 90 min workshop

Natalie Southgate

Natalie founded Chakradance in 1998 while working and studying in London. She qualified as a healer with National Federation of Spiritual Healers (UK) and with the College of Psychic Studies (UK) in 1999. She also gained a Diploma in Analytical Psychology and Healing with Distinction in 2000 with The Society for Psychology and Healing (UK). Natalie (together with her Chakradance partner Douglas Channing) has run workshops at Dr Deepak Chopra’s esteemed Chopra Centre in California, and at Dr Doreen Virtue’s acclaimed Angel Intuitive training courses. She co-authored the book ‘Chakradance _ Rhythm for your Soul’ (Hay House), and together with New World Music compiled the acclaimed Chakradance CD. Natalie and Douglas have also developed a Chakradance Facilitator Training Program that has gained recognition as an approved training provider through the International Institute of Complementary Therapists. Facilitators are now based around Australia, and overseas in the US and Europe

Douglas Channing - Director of Chakradance

Douglas joined Natalie in 2002 to help her grow Chakradance. He has a Graduate Certificate in Counselling and a Diploma in Remedial Massage. He co-authored the book ‘Chakradance: Rhythm for your Soul’ (Hay House), and together with Natalie runs workshops in Australia and internationally.

Abstract:

Chakradance is an experiential process linked to the body and imagination. Drawing on the wisdom of Jungian psychology, we use specific music, guided imagery, and spontaneous movement and mandala art to journey into the inner world of the chakra system.

Dancing through the ancient chakra system awakens the body, expands the mind, and calls out to the soul. Dancing the seven chakras is like dancing into seven different inner landscapes, each with its own lessons, meanings and stories. Held in a sacred space, we transition from our outer every-day life, into our rich inner, imaginative world.

Visual images may come out of the moving experience, as well as memories, impulses, insights, feelings, moods and body sensations. The experience is like a waking dream --we dance up forgotten parts of ourselves, and release the memories stored in our muscles. Our aches and pains reveal their stories and our hidden fears unmask themselves. When we enter the chakras through dance we enter not only our individual selves but also a collective experience passed through the ages, culture to culture.

The dance experience is always followed by a period of stillness with continued inner attentiveness. During the time we use personalized mandala art as a way of anchoring our experiences back into our conscious world.

Chakradance is a practice that aims to guide participants towards encountering the vastness of their full potential. In this 90-minute workshop we provide a brief overview of the chakras before guiding participants through an experiential journey through their own chakra system. There is also time for reflection, group feedback and discussion.

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 Spinning on a Thread: Primordial Vision, Ecopsychology and the Aboriginal DreamingDavid Tacey, PhD

David Tacey, PhD

Dr David Tacey is Associate Professor in Literature and Psychoanalytic Studies at La Trobe University, Melbourne. He is the author of twelve books, including Edge of the Sacred (1995/2009), ReEnchantment (Harper Collins, 2000), and The Spirituality Revolution (Harper Collins, 2003). His most recent book is Gods and Diseases: Making Sense of Our Physical and Mental Wellbeing (Sydney: Harper Collins, 2011), and forthcoming works include The Jung Reader (London: Routledge, 2012) and The Darkening Spirit (London: Routledge, 2012). David studied literature, psychology and philosophy at Flinders and Adelaide Universities, and completed post-doctoral studies in psychoanalysis in the United States. His main interest is in the psychology of the sacred, with particular emphasis on the condition of the sacred in a secular and disbelieving world. He is a public intellectual who is often asked to address contemporary issues, including ecological awareness, mental health, spirituality and Aboriginal Australia. His books have been translated into several languages, including Cantonese, Korean, Spanish, Portuguese and French.

Abstract:

Through the eyes of myth, religion and visionary literature it often seems that the world is spinning on a dream thread. If this thread is not given serious consideration, observed and attended, the world falls apart. It is a point of view that the rational intellect might dismiss as delusion, but the rational intellect is not a reliable guide when it comes to understanding the world as spiritual creation. This talk will explore various cultures and contexts in which a world sustaining ‘dream thread’ is featured, and will pay particular attention to the Aboriginal Dreaming as an ancient cosmology in which this idea is of central importance. The task in our time is to translate this ancient wisdom into terms and concepts which are able to be understood today. To this effect, I will explore Jung and Hillman’s ‘Ecopsychology’ as one such example, and this psychology is based on the study of the dream. In times of ecological emergency, there is a sense that the dream thread that binds the world is unravelling, and we need to understand this idea as best we can.

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 The MAPIN Strategy: a mindfulness-based approach for connecting with nature.Dr Peter R White

Dr Peter R White

Peter spent 20 years in the environmental planning field undertaking a variety of ecological, planning, policy and environmental management work for private and public sector agencies. He was also involved in environmental activism over many years including campaign management, providing technical advice to protest groups, and being a representative on council environmental committees. Following the completion of his PhD in the field of Ecopsychology in 2009, Peter facilitates nature connection groups in Sydney. He has just had his book on how to deepen experiences of nature connection published and is a full-time father to his two sons.

Abstract

In a world beset with environmental, political, economic and social disharmony and crises, more and more people are becoming worried about the state of the planet and the plight of human and nonhuman beings. These issues as well as the day-to-day challenges in our lives can create a range of chronic psychological problems such as stress, anxiety, despair, powerlessness, sadness, melancholia and even depression. These states tend to have a range of mental and physical impacts and reinforce many peoples sense of disconnection from the natural world and deeper aspects of their being.

One of the qualities we most need to develop and strengthen is our psychological resilience, the capacity to honestly and effectively deal with personal and/or global issues that potentially undermine our wellbeing and our sense of self. An effective strategy for becoming resilient is through revitalizing our perceptions and awareness of the world around us in a way that can re-connect us to nature/spirit and deeper aspects of ourselves. One particular and well-tried context for this revitalization is through experiencing regular intimate, contemplative interactions with natural places that both elevates and deepens perceptual awareness, consciousness and our sense of self.

The MAPIN Strategy, based upon Peter White’s doctoral research into nature connection, was developed as an intervention tool for coping with negative mental states, connecting more deeply with natural areas, expanding perceptual awareness and heightening consciousness. It uses a structured mindful perception and imaginal approach to evoke positive emotions and feelings, heightened states of consciousness, broadened existential perspectives and/or an expanded self-construal. The outcomes of the MAPIN Strategy are consistent with research in environmental psychology that positive environmental experiences with natural environments are closely associated with improvements in psychological wellbeing. It is consistent with research in the field of Ecopsychology that nonhuman nature meets not just our physical needs but also our spiritual, emotional and psychological needs.

Learning outcomes:

  1. To gain an experiential understanding of the MAPIN Strategy
  2. To understand its potential relevance to personal and professional contexts
  3. To experience nature connection
  4. To practice mindfulness in an outdoor setting

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 The Coming Guest: CG Jung's Augury and the 21st C.Dr John Woodcock - 45 min paper

Dr John Woodcock

John C. Woodcock Ph.D. is a Jungian Psychotherapist (since 1983) now in private practice in Sydney after returning from the USA in 2003 where he lived, worked, and trained for over twenty years. He is the self-published author of several books (through iUniverse.com) all of which represent his post-doctoral research into the question of our collective future as expressed through the hints of dreams and other phenomena, including our technological civilization. Further information may be found at his web site: www.lighthousdownunder.com and he can be reached at jwoodcock@lighthousedownunder.com.

Abstract:

In this presentation, Dr. Woodcock will show how our present reality of a total separation between self and world is the outcome, not of human error but of psychic movements begun millennia ago, now reaching fulfillment. He will then show how the psyche is also once again preparing the future in the form of dreams and auguries, offering us hints of emerging realities. This is indeed a portentous time and although the future remains the unknown future, the way we participate in its becoming determines how its hints and auguries appear to us as well as the final outcome. C. G. Jung participated with an attitude of hospitality and love. He thus could describe the unknown future as the Coming Guest rather than the current worldwide descriptions of impending disaster. This guest appeared to him in the form of an augury that he carved in the wall of his Bollingen retreat where it has lain virtually mute to the present time. Now we are in a position to take Jung’s hint and amplify it with modern dreams and/or works of art in order to get a fuller sense of what form of the future presses upon us, if we participate with an attitude of hospitality and love, rather than the current widespread rejection and fear. By appealing to a certain class of dream experiences, Dr. Woodcock will show how this intended future reality is passing strange indeed, often stretching those who apprehend its hints to psychological breaking point. It beggars current understanding yet if we make the effort and sacrifice to understand, we can become, as Jung said, participating mouthpieces in the birth of a new reality, born of a union of psyche and love.

 Dream Group 1Facilitator: Heather Keens

Heather Keens

I have been interested in dreamwork, and have kept a dream journal, for many years now. During the day I work as a counsellor. I have worked with dreams in various settings and attended a dream group for six years; I am very aware of the power of these groups to bring a dream to life.

Abstract:

Heather will be running a general morning dream group suitable for both beginners and more experienced dreamers. There will be an opportunity for some participants to share their dream in the group. Other group members may assist the dreamer to clarify or explore some aspects of the dream, e.g. colours, textures, emotions, title in order to increase the dreamer's awareness of their dream.

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 Dream Group 2Facilitator: Simon d'Orsogna

Simon d'Orsogna

Simon works as a facilitator, writer, project consultant and coach, helping individuals and teams transform themselves and their organisations. He assists them to see bigger, more inclusive perspectives, to think in deeper and more creative ways about their problems, and how to collaborate to come up with collective ideas that no single person could ever think of on her own. His interests include pre-verbal knowing, social dreaming, kinaesthetic and body-centred approaches to generativity and co-creation. Seeing many change efforts miss the human dimension (e.g. just pouring more information-training-technology in), made Simon want to explore the transformational-adaptive aspects of adult learning. A variety of frameworks provide Simon with useful insights including systems, somatic and psychological approaches. He is currently studying adult developmental approaches to coaching with Bob Kegan and Lisa Lahey at Harvard University, MA.

Abstract:

Social or group dreaming invites people to come together and explore dreams. When a dream is recounted it becomes a social artifact. Others respond with dreams, associations and amplifications. These connections invite you to be emotionally in touch with something more than ‘just myself’. From here, more can be discerned, as when we are listened to carefully, more can be said. Participants make themselves available for new thoughts, drawing from the images and connections made. No previous experience is necessary. The purpose in sharing and exploring the dream material is to learn through experience about the social nature of dreaming and the world.

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 Dream Group 3Facilitator: Sven Doehner

Sven Doehner

Sven Doehner, PhD, MFA, is a depth psychotherapist, teacher, workshop leader and writer. Born, raised and living in Mexico City, he trained in Archetypal Psychology with James Hillman and has guided workshops and training programs since 1981, in Mexico, Europe and North as well as South America. Director of the Instituto de Psicolog_aProfunda en Mexico since 1991, he blends Jungian-Archetypal Psychology with ancestral healing and spiritual practices, innovating experiences that give unexpected form to images in dreams (and life) through vocal sound sensitivity and work (emitting and listening) - thereby generating new somatic, emotional, mental and spiritual movements in the lives of those who work with him. He earned a PhD in Clinical Psychology, participated in the training program of the C.G. Jung Institute-Boston (six years), worked psychoanalytically with James Hillman (nine years), and trained in Bioenergetics and as a somatic movement educator in the School of BodyMindMovement. He has also worked (since 1986) with native Mayan, Zapotec and Mixtec healers in southern Mexico. In addition to a private practice in Mexico City, he is writing about his work: “A Sound Imagination: creative meetings with the Unexpected".

Abstract:

Experience the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual movements awakened when working vocally with the sounds that appear with our dreams. Participants will develop and hone hearing skills, learning to listen for, and to the images that come with the sounds that appear with a dream and the telling of it. We will also practice using vocal expression as a medium for images to take on new forms and significance. Meet the unexpected creatively by discovering the sounds in our images. An innovative, fun, and surprisingly practical and deeply moving dream-work.

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 Dream Group 4Facilitator: Lesley Hamlyn

Lesley Hamlyn

I am a practicing counselor with a BSc (Psych) and a Grad Dip Counseling. I am a member of CAPA NSW. I have an interest in Jungian psychology and have been a committee member of the Jung Society of Sydney for 6 years. I am experienced in facilitating groups and have also been a member of a private dream group for 12 years.

Abstract:

This dream group will engage in the exploration of the feelings, images and metaphors of a group member's dream offering. We will use an abbreviated form of Montague Ullman's method and bring ideas from other dreamwork authors such as Robert Johnson, Sally Gillespie, Jeremy Taylor and Will Phillips. We will work in a safe respectful way, mindful of confidentiality. We will try to be aware of the learning’s and themes experienced in the conference and how they may be reflected in our work with the chosen dream.

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Program Information

Please note that the program information for the 2012 Conference - Dreams and Imagination: Healing Pathways is subject to change.

Thursday Conference Program Schedule

Time Activity
2pm - 9pm Conference Registration
5:15pm - 6pm Welcome Reception (Foyer Southern Cross Hall)
6pm - 7:15pm Dinner in the Dining Room  (For residential attendees and for attendees who have purchased  diinner meal) 
7:15pm - 7:45pm Conference Opening and Overview
7:45pm - 8:30pm

Keynote Presentation

Dreamlines, Songlines, Lifelines
Jody Grundy, (IASD Chairperson)

8:30pm - 9pm Entering the Labyrinth

Friday Conference Program Schedule

Time      
7am - 8:45am Breakfast
7am - 8am

Dream group 1

Facilitator
Heather Keens

Dream group 2

Facilitator
Simon d’Orsogna

Dream group 3

Facilitator
Dr Sven Doehner

Dream group 4

Facilitator
Lesley Hamlyn

8:45am - 9am

Conference Overview

9am - 10am

Keynote Presentation

Spinning on a Dream Thread: Primordial Vision, Ecopsychology and the Aboriginal Dreaming.
David Tacey (PhD)

10am - 10:30am Morning tea
10:30am - 12:30pm

Panel

Imagining Climate Change
Sally Gillespie;Dr Jonathan Marshall; Dr Lisa Roberts

 

Workshop

Martian Enquiry in Dreamwork
Margaret Bowater

Papers

Exploring Aspects of personal and group transformative changes in long-term dreamgroups
Dr Susan Benson and Dr Diane Rickards (60 mins)

 

A sound imagination: Creative Meetings with the Unexpected. 
Dr Sven Doehner (60 mins)

12:30pm - 2pm Lunch in the Dining Room  ( For residential attendees and for attendees who have purchased  lunch meal) 
2pm - 3:30pm

Panel

Using Dreams and Imagination to Respond Creatively to Ecological Degradation
Dr Lorraine Shannon; Professor Kumi Sato; Kim Satchell (Kangaloon Group for Creative Ecology)  

Workshop

Chakra Dance: Rhythm for your Soul
Natalie Southgate

Papers

Healing Dragon Dreams
Jeremy Seligson (45min)

 

Borrowed Imagination
Leonie Reisberg (45min)

3:30pm - 4pm Afternoon Tea
4pm - 5pm

Workshop

Embodied Imagination and Healing Practices
Robert Bosnak

Paper

Dreams and Ceramic Art

Joy Bye (30 mins)

Peter Cameron (30 mins)

 

Video

Dreaming of Nature, and  the Nature of Dreaming
Dr Kelly Bulkeley

5pm - 5:45pm

Open space

A facilitated, collaborative learning approach which harnesses and acknowledges the power of individuals within groups to self-organise and create learning agendas and experience for themselves

5:45pm - 6pm Open time
6pm - 7:30pm Dinner in the Dining room ( For residential attendees and for attendees who have purchased  diinner meal) 
7:30pm - 9 pm

Special Event (Sharing the Art Space)

 
A conversation with Peter Cameron, Artist in Residence, about Art and Imaginal Spaces An interactive art installation. (Dr Lisa Roberts) Pattern Recognition, Primal Forms, Dreams, and Climate Change

Saturday Conference Program Schedule

Time      
7am - 8:45am Breakfast
7am - 8am

Dream group 1

Facilitator
Heather Keens

Dream group 2

Facilitator
Simon d’Orsogna

Dream group 3

Facilitator
Dr Sven Doehner

Dream group 4

Facilitator
Lesley Hamlyn

8:45am - 9am

Conference Overview

9am - 10am

Keynote Presentation

Working with Dreams, Trauma and Physical Illness
Robert Bosnak 

10am - 10:30am Morning tea
10:30am - 12:30pm

Panel

In Dreams the Land Speaks to Us
Jody Grundy; Erla Ronan;Dr Ben Zion Weiss

Workshop

Mandala of Dreams
Felicity Oswell

Papers

Ancestral visitations unto the fourth Generation
Dr Judith Pickering (45 min)

 

The Coming Guest. CG Jung’s Augury and the 21st Century
Dr John woodcock (45 min) 

 

Dreaming and Liminality: Examining the ways dreams helps us cross a life-changing threshold
Dr Geoff Navara (30 min)

12:30pm - 2pm Lunch in the Dining Room ( For residential attendees and for attendees who have purchased  lunch meal) 
2pm - 3:30pm

Workshop

A Slice of Time
Leonie Reisberg

Workshop

Working with Dreams
Craig Jarman

Papers

Getting to Topic, Phd’s, Dreaming & the Hermeneutic Circle
Dr Claire Jankelson (45 min)

 

Explorations in Dreaming in the Land of Dreamtime from a Process-oriented Perspective.

Jennifer  Fox (45 min)

3:30pm - 4pm Afternoon Tea
4pm - 5pm

Workshop

Kinaesthetic Modelling
Simon D’Orsogna

 Workshop

The MAPIN Strategy: a mindfulness based approach for connecting with nature

Dr Peter White

 

Papers

Jung, Alchemy, History, and Imagination
Dr Jonathan Marshall  (60 min)

 

 

5pm - 5:45pm

Workshop

Kinaesthetic Modelling continues

Workshop  

The Mapin Strategy continues

Open Space/Art Room is Open

5:45pm - 6pm Open time
6pm - 7:30pm Dinner in the Dining Room ( For residential attendees and for attendees who have purchased  diinner meal) 
7:30pm - 9 pm

Dreams within Story and Story within Dreams  with Donna Jacobs Sife

Sunday Conference Program Schedule

Time      
7am - 8:45am Breakfast
7am - 8am

Dream group 1

Facilitator
Heather Keens

Dream group 2

Facilitator
Simon d’Orsogna

Dream group 3

Facilitator
Dr Sven Doehner

Dream group 4

Facilitator
Lesley Hamlyn

8:45am - 9am

Conference Overview

9am - 10am

Workshop

Invitation to Dream a Healing Dream
Jeremy Seligson

Paper

Under a Spell: Fairytales as Inspiration
Sarah Gibson

Panel

Embodied Imagination Practice in an Australian Setting.

Jennifer Hume, Michelle Morris,Mary Murray, Jessica Rose, Patrica Rose

10am - 10:30am Morning Tea
10:30am - 12pm

Special Event

Conference Gathering: A Collaborative Conversation and Enquiry

12pm - 12:30pm

Closing Ceremony

Walking the Labyrinth

12:30pm Optional Light Lunch in the Dining Room ( For Residential Attendees)

Post Conference Comments

Here’s what Participants had to Say.

"A great gathering, dynamic and enlivening"

"It was such a rich and varied experience…soulfood really."

"A good vision realised, the program was excellent, creative, offering a wonderful choice of academic presentations, creative art and body focused workshops, small and large group sessions, and social gathering."

"Cohesive, well-designed and well-run event"

"Want more of the same again!"

"Seeded the field for future dream work in the region."

"Appreciated the depth of sharing, inspiring presenters, trust and open friendly environment."

"Well organized, seemingly seamless smooth operation reflecting prior preparation and work."

"Papers were accessible by lay people."

"Appreciated the spaciousness of the venue, comfortable rooms, and nature walks."

"Valued the balance of theory and imaginative practice."

"Loved the conference."

"Deepened understanding and respect for the significance of dreams."

"A Great feeling of open engagement."

"A very rich experience."

"Making deep connections."

"The conference was a resounding success."

"Sense of community built over the conference."

"Life changing and experience of deep healing." 

Participants Visions for the Future

  • Biennial conference with opportunities for more dreamgroups, neuroscience presentations, open space opportunities, indigenous representation and participation.
  • Build networks supporting local contact, face-to-face meetings and linking into regional and international networks.
  • Growing community
  • Regular events including day and weekend opportunities offering time for longer experiential sessions and opportunities to participate in different modes of dream work.
  • Dream groups on line
  • Online learning opportunities
  • Build resources for applying dreamwork to clients with complex needs and little resources
  • Find uses for dream data collected by individuals
  • Teaching children and families to respect and value dreams and dreaming.
  • Develop ways of sharing knowledge and information about IASD regional network and Dream Network Australia.
  • Continue to build ways to deepen connections to land, place and the rhythms of nature through dreams, imagination and mindfulness
  • More multi-disciplinary dialogue between dream workers, theorists and other sections of the community.

What you would like to have at another conference?

  • More time
  • More and longer dreamgroups
  • More people building the base to contribute to the conference vision

Study Your Dreams

Embodied Imagination 3 year Dreamwork Training Program commences March 2016.

Embodied Imagination 3 year Dreamwork Training Program commences March 2016.

The Embodied Imagination Approach developed by Robert Bosnak works with dreams and waking memories and is practised with individuals and groups in the felds of psychotherapy, medicine [triggering the self-healing reflex], theatre, business, art and creative research.

  • Apr 06, 2016
Finding our inner library of dream symbols

Dream Inspirations Jane Austin

Group Dreamwork is a powerful portal to connecting to our personal and collective libraries of dreams, symbols, stories and myths.

  • Nov 15, 2015
Dreaming and Creativity

Dreaming and Creativity Dr Susannah Benson

I recently finished editing a book chapter on Landscape and Ancestral Dreaming in a book that IASD is publishing on Dreams that Change Our Lives. This publication is an anthology that covers a range of areas to include: spirituality; childhood; ancestry; grieving; health; lucidity; creativity and transcendence. Dreamers in this book share personal stories and dreams that highlight the power of dreams to transform and change lives.

  • Apr 05, 2016
Dr Sally Gillespie

Dr Sally Gillespie Dr Susannah Benson

In this interview, Dr Gillespie shares how the experience of feeling both accompanied and guided through life by dreams has been both a gift and a challenge. She shares how following the impact of a powerful dream, she retired from her long term psychotherapy practice and embraced full time doctoral research into the psychological experience of engaging with climate change issues.

  • Mar 31, 2016

“Inspiration, new knowledge, renewed sense of clarity and direction, new connections and lots of joy.”2014 Dream Alchemy Conference